Fringe Review: Oh God – The Drums

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Playwright: Brad Hart
Director: Evalyn Parry
Cast: Brad Hart

Review by: Thomas Allen

Through a smart, well-scripted monologue, Brad Hart weaves an intriguing story about his life that makes “Oh God-The Drums” a must see at this year’s 10th Anniversary Fringe Festival.

Hart talks about growing up, his undying love for drumming, and drummers, and his rocky relationship with his father.

The story was briefly educational, for those unfamiliar with the history of classic rock, or jazz. From Neil Pert, to Mike Shrieve and Tony Williams, Hart gives a brief history of drummers and the impact they’ve made on him.

He had his 25-year-old drum kit with him on stage, the only kit he’s ever owned. Throughout the show he would use the drums to demonstrate how, sometimes awkwardly throughout his life, he learned percussion for real.

The story of growing up that unfolds was no-holds bars; he really puts himself out there on the stage for the audience. Hart honestly describes moments and stages in his life and the internal struggle with the love of his drums and the absent love of his father that they represent.

In his monologue, he tells you about his failures, or his feelings of insignificance. He pulls at heartstrings as he spills his emotions in front of captivated onlookers. He drew laughter, understanding, appreciation, and sympathetic “awes” from the audience.

It was a refreshing story about a man who fulfilled his childhood dream, which can be rare now-a-days. He didn’t care about how much money he’s made, or that he’s never lived on the ground floor throughout his whole adulthood. Hart is just happy to be doing what he loves and we should applaud him for that.

Oh, and his drummer jokes are priceless. The only thing missing in this play was a wicked drum solo.

This article is also published for the Fringe Festival 2013 Community Reviews.

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